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Tornit
Inuit-sculpture
Inuit Sculpture
[[{{{map}}}|250px]]
Background
Type Bigfoot
First Sighting 12th-century (Homo Gardarensis)
Last Sighting Unknown
Country Canada, United States, Greenland
Habitat Remote Corners of the Arctic
Possible Population Small (possibly extinct)

The Tornit are a race of wildmen in Inuit mythology. According to the Anchorage Daily, "...Stories of the Alaska

Bushmen, or tornits, have been told since the first humans crossed the Bering Land Bridge. In the beginning, the story goes, the Inuit and the tornits lived peacefully in villages near each other and shared common hunting grounds. The Inuit people often built and used kayaks for hunting. While the tornits were unable to master the building of kayaks, they were very aware of the advantages of having and using one. One story goes that a young tornit borrowed a young Inuit's kayak without permission and damaged the bottom of it. The young Inuit became very angry and stabbed the tornit in the nape of the neck while he was sleeping, killing him. The rest of the tornits feared that they too, would be killed by the Inuit and fled the country, rarely to be seen again. Since that time, many stories have come out of the bush of hunters disappearing, later found dead and mangled or never seen again. Apparently, hunters and the Tornits no longer peacefully shared common hunting grounds (www.adn.com)."

According to cryptozoologist Loren Coleman, "The white man’s names

are Sasquatch (invented in 1929 in Canada) and Bigfoot (first used in California in 1958). The name True Giants was coined by Mark A. Hall only a few decades ago. Most First Nations groups, Canadian Natives, American Natives, Inupiat–Yupik, and Inuits have their own names...Inuit people (Inupiat, Inuvialuit, Nunavut, Nunavik, Nunatsiavut, and Kalaallit) have been known to call these creatures Tornit, but also Turnit, Sauman Kar, and Saumen Kar (cryptomundo.com)."

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