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Sivathere Hiuppo

Sivatherium was a genus of prehistoric giraffid which ranged throughout Africa to the Indian Subcontinent. It was a very large animal; Sivatherium giganteum is by weight, the largest giraffid known, and also possibly the largest ruminant of all time. Generally considered to have gone extinct at least 8,000 years ago, some authors believe it may have persisted for longer than is currently believed,[1] and a minority have suggested that it may still live.[2] Other genera in the subfamily Sivatheriinae include Bramatherium, Hydaspitherium, and Indratherium.

In cryptozoology[]

George Eberhart lists a theory that the qilin or Chinese unicorn may have been inspired by late-surviving sivatheres, Willy Le] believed the sirrush of the Ishtar Gate represented a living sivathere, and Herbert Wendt suggested that the head of the god Set was based on Libytherium, another prehistoric giraffid.[1]

Dale Drinnon proposes that the supposedly ceratopsian savannah ngoubou, which is reported from Cameroon, may be a persisting sivathere. He suggests that the horned frill and "beaked mouth" of the ngoubou might in fact be a Sivatheriums branching horns and drooping upper lip, and notes that the cryptid is said to give live birth to calves, and has a thin elephant-like tail. He also notes that reconstructions of the Gambian water monster [ninki-nanka]] resemble sivatheres.[2] A correspondent of Karl Shuker suggested the alleged Indian tygomelia was a living sivathere.[3]

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Syrian and Egyptian figurines currently housed in the British Museum; a Russian statuette and tin whistles from Siberia which may depict Bramatherium, a close relative of Sivatherium

Possible depictions[]

A number of artefacts which may depict sivatheres have been discovered across North Africa and the Near East.[4] These include an 8,000 year old petroglyph in a Saharan rock shelter; rock paintings in India.

Syrian and Egyptian figurines currently housed in the British Museum; a Russian statuette and tin whistles from Siberia which may depict Bramatherium, a close relative of Sivatherium;[1] and a Hittite cylinder impression from Turkey depicting an animal with moose-like horns. Dale A. Drinnon believes that African rock art at Kuppenhole, Tanzania, may depict a sivathere,[2] while Michel Raynal suggests that Algerian rock art at Tassili identified as an okapi by Bernard Heuvelmans may represent some other fossil giraffid.[5]

Notes and references[]

  1. 1.0 1.1 1.2 Eberhart, George M. (2002) Mysterious Creatures: A Guide to Cryptozoology ABC-CLIO, Inc. ISBN 1-57607-283-5
  2. 2.0 2.1 2.2 Drinnon, Dale A. Frontiers of Zoology: Surviving Sivatheres frontiersofzoology.blogspot.com [Accessed 8 February 2019]
  3. Shuker, Karl P. N. ShukerNature: NEVER TANGLE WITH A TYGOMELIA - OR TANGO WITH A TOKANDIA! karlshuker.blogspot.com [Accessed 8 February 2019]
  4. Janis, Christine "Fossil Ungulate Mammals Depicted on Archaeological Artifacts," Cryptozoology 6 (1987)
  5. Coleman, Loren Cryptomundo » Another Giraffid/Okapid Cryptid? cryptomundo.com [Accessed 24 May 2020]
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