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Chaac
Maya God Chaac
Rain deity impersonator, Classic period
1280px-Tlaloc glyph.svg
Aztec Equivalent Deity Tlaloc
Background
Type Amphibian/Reptilian Dwarf
First Sighting Maya Classic period (c. 250–900 AD)
Last Sighting February 12, 1965
Country Mexico
Habitat Santiago River
Possible Population Small
Chaac is the rain god worshiped by the Mayans of Southern Mexico. To the Aztecs of Central Mexico, this deity's

equivalent is called Tlaloc. Both are described as having reptilian/amphibian like qualities. A Mexican cryptid encounter in 1965 reported a creature that closely resembled the god.

Mythology

Chaac played the role of a god of agriculture and fertility in the Mayan belief system. In addition to controlling the rains and storms, Chaac was also believed to have had power over more destructive natural phenomena, such as hailstorms and hurricanes. At times, Chaac was thought to have been one god, whilst at others, he was four separate deities. To their Aztec neighbors, these four deities are known as tlaloques.

Description

Chaac is usually depicted with a human body showing reptilian or amphibian scales, flippers and with a non-human head evincing fangs and a long, pendulous nose. Like many other Mayan deities, the representation of Chaac is that of a human being with animal features. In the case of Chaac, these features include reptilian or amphibian attributes such as scales, a long, curly nose, and a protruding lower lip. Chaac was one of the oldest Mayan deities. Yet, most images of him are said to come from painted vessels of the Classical period, and Postclassical codices. It has also been speculated that since Chaac was believed to have been helped by four dwarfs, children were this deity’s preferred offering.

Sightings 1965, Mexico

On February 12, 1965, while slingshot hunting adjacent to the Santiago River, a 19 year-old by the name of Francisco Estrada Acosta had a face-to-face encounter with an entity that resembled the Mayan deity. According to Luis Ramirez Reyes, author of “Contacto: México: Historia del Fenómeno OVNIA,” and Rubén Manrique, the ufologist who first broke the case, teenage Acosta was hunting for small game in a mining area situated in the colony of Morales, which is located in the municipality of San Luis Potosi, when he was suddenly confronted by an amphibian like creature.

“[IT WAS] A TALL FIGURE WITH A LARGE OVAL-SHAPED HEAD, HUGE, REDDISH, PHOSPHORESCENT EYES AND A LARGE TOAD-LIKE MOUTH.”

The flabbergasted Acosta could only stare in what one must assume was abject terror as the bizarre being extended its “flipper-like hand” towards him; touching his hand. The youthful hunter would later recall the sensation of the thing’s flesh as being “cold and scaly,” not unlike that of a reptile. The creature then flew away to the heavens.

Sources

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